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Workplace Standard First Aid

Workplace Standard First Aid provides comprehensive training covering all aspects of first aid and CPR. Workplace Standard First Aid incorporates all of Emergency First Aid and is designed for those who require a more in-depth understanding of first aid including: legal implications of first aid treatment, spinal injuries, heat or cold injuries, bone and joint injuries, chest injuries, and medical emergencies. Includes CPR-C certification.

The first aid program is not restricted to aquatic candidates. You can use the Lifesaving Society's first aid awards to train non-aquatic staff (camp, playground, maintenance, etc.) and the general public.

Prerequisite: None.

Evaluation & certification: Current Standard First Aid Instructors evaluate most items, but only current Standard First Aid Examiners may certify candidates. The Lifesaving Society deems its certifications to be "current" for 24 months from the certification date.

Candidate recognition: Certification card.

Required reference material: Canadian First Aid Manual or Canadian Lifesaving Manual

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First Aid - Forearm splint

Recertification: Complete Workplace Standard First Aid course.

at-a-glance

Workplace Standard First Aid includes the ten Emergency First Aid items in addition to the following:

  1. Demonstrate two-rescuer adult, child and infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation on a manikin.
  2. Demonstrate the recognition and care of a victim with a suspected spinal injury on land.
  3. Demonstrate the recognition and care of a victim suffering from:
    • heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke
    • hypothermia and frostbite
  4. Demonstrate the recognition and care of a bone or joint injury.
  5. Demonstrate the recognition and care of a chest injury.
  6. Demonstrate the recognition and care of a head injury.
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  8. Demonstrate the recognition and care of a seizure victim.
  9. Demonstrate the recognition and care of a diabetic emergency.
  10. Demonstrate the recognition and care of a victim suffering from suspected poisoning.
  11. Demonstrate an understanding of the effects of stress on victims, rescuers, and bystanders, as well as the consequences of an unsuccessful rescue.